College student writing about 19th century and 20th century art and culture.

The Card Players - 1894-1895, by Paul Cezanne. In this painting, we see two peasants immersed in smoking pipes and playing cards. This is a scene of quiet, still concentration: both men are focused entirely on their game. 

The Card Players - 1894-1895, by Paul Cezanne. In this painting, we see two peasants immersed in smoking pipes and playing cards. This is a scene of quiet, still concentration: both men are focused entirely on their game. 

War (Bob Marley)

Until the philosophy which hold one race superior
And another
Inferior
Is finally
And permanently
Discredited
And abandoned -
Everywhere is war -
Me say war.

That until there no longer
First class and second class citizens of any nation
Until the colour of a man’s skin
Is of no more significance than the colour of his eyes -
Me say war.

That until the basic human rights
Are equally guaranteed to all,
Without regard to race -
Dis a war.

That until that day
The dream of lasting peace,
World citizenship
Rule of international morality
Will remain in but a fleeting illusion to be pursued,
But never attained -
Now everywhere is war - war.

And until the ignoble and unhappy regimes
that hold our brothers in Angola,
In Mozambique,
South Africa
Sub-human bondage
Have been toppled,
Utterly destroyed -
Well, everywhere is war -
Me say war.

War in the east,
War in the west,
War up north,
War down south -
War - war -
Rumours of war.
And until that day,
The African continent
Will not know peace,
We Africans will fight - we find it necessary -
And we know we shall win
As we are confident
In the victory

Of good over evil -
Good over evil, yeah!
Good over evil -
Good over evil, yeah!
Good over evil -
Good over evil, yeah!

Reggae is a music genre which developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. It is based on ska (an earlier form of Jamaican popular music) and is most easily recognized by the rhythmic accents on the off-beat. This music style became popular internationally in the 1970s, especially in Britain, the United States, and Africa.
Reggae songs aimed to raise the political consciousness of the audience through their politicized lyrics that addressed social and economic injustice. Common topics were anti-racism, anti-colonialism, ani-capitalism, black nationalism, Rastafari movement (which encourages the relocation of the African diaspora to Africa and deifies the Ethiopian emperor Haile Selassie I), and the effects of poverty. Many reggae songs also promote the use of cannabis, which is considered a sacrament in the Rastafari movement. Reggae’s biggest star remains Bob Marley.

Reggae is a music genre which developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. It is based on ska (an earlier form of Jamaican popular music) and is most easily recognized by the rhythmic accents on the off-beat. This music style became popular internationally in the 1970s, especially in Britain, the United States, and Africa.

Reggae songs aimed to raise the political consciousness of the audience through their politicized lyrics that addressed social and economic injustice. Common topics were anti-racism, anti-colonialism, ani-capitalism, black nationalism, Rastafari movement (which encourages the relocation of the African diaspora to Africa and deifies the Ethiopian emperor Haile Selassie I), and the effects of poverty. Many reggae songs also promote the use of cannabis, which is considered a sacrament in the Rastafari movement. Reggae’s biggest star remains Bob Marley.

Bob Marley

Bob Marley (1945-1981) was a Jamaican singer and writer of reggae music; he also played the guitar. Marley formed the Wailers group in 1965 and made reggae widely known around the world. With his songs, he also popularized Rastafarian beliefs globally. (Rastafarian identity first emerged in Jamaica: it allowed displaced Africans  to connect to their ancestral homeland.) Marley’s songs had spiritually and socially conscious lyrics and promoted peace and tolerance.

Marley performed at the Smile Jamaica concert in 1976. This concert was intended to bring peace to the people of Jamaica and suppress the strong political tensions that brutally divided Jamaica at the time. Two days prior to the concert, the singer was lightly wounded in an unsuccessful assassination attempt made on his life.

In 1978, Marley performed at another event aimed at curtailing the violence stemming from the rivalries of two political parties in Jamaica (PNP and JLP) - the One Love Peace Concert. Marley received the Medal of Peace from the United Nations in recognition of his courageous attempt to bridge Jamaica’s cavernous political divide. 

During his world tour, Marley also visited Africa. His politically progressive songs championed pan-African solidarity, and he had a strong influence on the African continent. His revolutionary yet unifying music challenged colonialism and racism. The influence of Bob Marley remains unparalleled upon various populations, irrespective of race, color or creed. 

My music fights against the system that teaches to live and die.

—Bob Marley

No Woman, No Cry - released 1974. The song is about growing up in the ghetto, and is persuading a woman not to cry and that things will get better.

Redemption Song - by Bob Marley, released 1980. A song of freedom.

Bob Marley - Stir It Up (written 1967 for Marley’s wife Rita)


Claude Monet

Claude Monet (1840-1926) was a key figure in the Impressionist movement. He mostly depicted the landscape and leisure activities of Paris and its surroundings. In order to capture nature more accurately, Manet often worked out of doors. His work includes series paintings, in which Monet painted the same site again and again, recording how its appearance changed with the time of the day. He paid particular attention to light and shadow. In his later work, Monet focused on the picturesque water-lily pond, which he had created on his property at Giverny.

Magpie(1868-69) - early works:

The Boat Studio (1876) - later Impressionism:

Water Lilies (The Clouds) (1903):

The Japanese Bridge - last years: